JHP Paddle8 Online Auction LIVE December 2nd to Dec 16th!

 Man Ray’s- Hattie Carnegie wearing a Vionnet Dress

Man Ray’s Glass Tears (variant)

Today we launch our online photo auction, the JHP Paddle8 Auction.

By Jackie Augustine – December 2, 2014I
f you missed our JHP Masters of Modern Photography on November 6th, you will be delighted to learn that we have created a partnership with Paddle8.  Paddle8 curates auctions of art and design and partners with non-profits on benefit auctions, offering collectors the chance to bid on carefully sourced works.
This is a great opportunity to own some amazing photographs from photography legends and support the Josephine Herrick Project.
100% of all proceeds are charitable donations! Visit the JHP Paddle 8 auction today: www.paddle8.com/auction/jhp
Two Man Ray photographs will be included in the JHP Paddle8 Auction. Here’s some information from the Man Ray Trust and some background about the subkject of these two photograph, Hattie Carnegie.
“Legendary Photography, painter, and maker of objects and films, Man Ray was on the most versatile and inventive artists of this century. Born in Philadelphia in 1890, he knew the worlds of Greenwich Village in the avant garde era following the 1913 Armory show; Paris in the 1920’s and 1930’s, where he played a key role in the Dada and Surrealist movements; The Hollywood of the 1940s, where he joined others chased by war from their homes in Europe; and finally, Paris again until his death in 1976. “- from Man Ray Trust
About Hattie Carnegie
Fashion Entrepreneur/Dress Designer. In 1900, she immigrated to the United States, and settled with her family in New York City. There is a famous story that while on the ship to America, Hattie asked a fellow voyager about who the richest and most prosperous people in America were. The answer was, “Andrew Carnegie” and according to the story, young Hattie decided to change her name to Carnegie. Eventually the rest of her family dropped Kanengeiser and adopted the Carnegie name, a practice that was common among immigrants. She worked at various millinery establishments, and at Macy’s. But in 1909 she, along with friend Rose Roth, opened her own business, a tiny hat shop. It was called “Carnegie – Ladies’ Hatter.” As the business grew, Hattie and Rose were able to hire workers who made the designs that Hattie developed. At this time, all fashion came from Paris, and so Hattie studied the Parisian styles, choosing only the best, and adapting them for her customers. And while she could neither sketch nor sew, Hattie was ve ry good at communicating to her workers exactly what she wanted them to do. Her shop, at its peak, carried her own ‘Hattie Carnegie Couture’ collection, Paris couture imports from Chanel, Vionnet and Dior, a fur line, her several ready-to-wear lines under different names, a costume jewelry line, and a cosmetic line. Her dress designs were a success and soon she had such clients as Joan Crawford and the Duchess of Windsor. Hattie Carnegie’s colorful clothing and chic costume jewelry, even today, are greatly sought after by fashion and jewelry collectors. In 1956 Hattie was laid to rest and unfortunately for the business, much of the disirability of the label lay in the woman herself, and after her death, the label lost a lot of its luster. The business closed its doors for good in 1976.

Visit the JHP Paddle 8 Auction today: www.paddle8.com/auction/jhp

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