JHP Volunteer Voices: Looking Back at Photoville 2015

Looking Back on Photoville 2015

By Ariel Alyce Bornstein

As the chill of late October portends the winter frost, I’m looking back to a summery September Sunday, when I attended Brooklyn Bridge Park’s annual Photoville exhibition as a volunteer for the Josephine Herrick Project.

Being a new volunteer and a first-time Photoville goer, I felt slightly uncertain walking through the long rows of corrugated shipping containers, each one bursting with light and color from the displays set up inside. Upon reaching container #47, Maureen McNeil’s friendly face welcomed me into the booth, which was decked out in all things JHP.

On the left wall, tacked up with knobby magnets, a perfect grid of prints represented student works from JHP-lead programs. Facing opposite was a selection of professional works from several of JHP’s volunteer instructors. On the back wall of the much-deeper-than-it-looked container, an informational poster with Josephine Herrick’s formidable image held court between the two separate displays. The layout was very effective and almost seemed like an allusion to the charitable actions Josephine took towards bringing quality photography instruction to “communities without a voice”.

Settling in, I joined Maureen in providing info and insight on the foundation to the well-heeled hipsters, late-summer tourists and old school New Yorkers who browsed airily through the exhibits. It was inspiring to see the genuine interest visitors had in JHP’s mission! Many expressed a desire to learn more about the foundation and ways to become involved.

Throughout my volunteer shift, one particular student work continued to catch my eye and interest. Against a plain backdrop, a grey-weathered veteran peered up with a playful Mona Lisa smile, his bohemian beads unhidden from beneath the forest green work shirt that matched his military cap. His benevolent eyes trailed my movements in and around the container, reminding me of the servicemen who inspired Josephine to begin this project 75 years ago.

As the afternoon cooled, a gusty rain whooshed in from the water, bringing new spectators to our container. Herding them in, we brought their attention to the displays and showed off the glossy photo-books from past programs. The atmosphere was festive as rows filled up on the sign-in mailing list and piles of postcards flattened towards the table.

A brief lull in the rain brought my volunteering shift to an end. I returned to Manhattan feeling shiny and inspired by the kindness and incredible sincerity of our Photoville booth visitors.

Thank you so much to Maureen and the entire JHP team for giving me the opportunity to volunteer and report on such a remarkable event!

– Ariel Alyce is an NYC-based writer.

 

JHP Program Coordinator with dedicated teaching volunteers Susan and Romina.

Isadora, JHP volunteer videographer, standing and smiling with her Photoville print!

The participant wall at JHP. Photos shown here were captured during one of the 2014 JHP programs in the NYC community.

Volunteer Photographers Needed!

JHP is now interviewing volunteer photographers
to teach free programs to underserved communities
in NYC area. Send letter & resume to maureen@jhproject.org

Volunteer Photography Instructors

Our photographers are an active group of volunteers that donate their time and expertise to our diverse populations in New York area. JHP is looking for experienced photographers that are comfortable teaching the basics of digital photography from a basic academic level to a more advanced level, but that also have patience and flexibility to fit the needs of a sometimes mixed group of individuals with different levels of learning abilities and interest.

For more information about the duties of volunteer photographers visit: http://jhproject.org/about/our-photographers/volunteer-photographers-needed/

 

For The Cause: Using Your Photography For A Purpose

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Left: This image of native plant restoration was shot during a five-year rehab project on a local creek for Friends of Deer Creek. It has been used to apply for grants and to attract local volunteers to continue the project. Right: This image of collecting water quality data has been used by the Sierra Streams Institute to help apply for grant funding for ongoing restoration projects. Photos © Josh Miller Photography
 
I just read a great article by Josh Miller at Shutterbug.com.  It explains how photographers can help small organizations by using their photography for a cause. At RTP, we are a small organization that helps a diverse audience “transform their lives through the power of photography.”  We are looking for some volunteer photographers in the New York City area to help spend a few hours a week or a month to make a difference in their lives and yours.  If you are interested, please click on this link for more information:
Thanks Josh and Shutterbug for a great article!
Jackie Augustine
President, Board of Directors
Rehabilitation Through Photography
 
 
By Josh Miller – Posted May 21, 2012 – Shutterbug.com
 
Since the development of photography in the early 1800s, there has always been a strong tradition of photographers using their work to promote conservation and social justice issues. One need only to look at the development of the National Park System in the United States to see the impact early photographers had on conservation. William Henry Jackson, with his 1871 Yellowstone photographs, helped push through legislation that established Yellowstone as the world’s first National Park. Another well-known example of a conservationist photographer was Ansel Adams, whose tireless efforts both as a photographer and as a 37-year member of the Sierra Club’s Board of Directors led to the establishment of Kings Canyon National Park in 1940. 

This image has been used by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy several times to promote their conservation efforts throughout the Sierras. This version was created as a magnet and distributed throughout the California Legislature before an important conservation vote.
© Josh Miller Photography

The International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) was established in 2003 by Cristina Mittermeier in an effort to better connect photographers with each other and with environmental and cultural issues. The iLCP organizes photo shoots around the world that bring together groups of photographers in “Rapid Assessment Visual Expeditions” or “RAVEs” to photograph specific locations or cultures under threat. These RAVEs are a way to quickly create bodies of work that can be used by local grassroots and nonprofit organizations to promote immediate, positive changes. While the iLCP helps to organize the RAVEs, their goal is to make the resulting images available to the appropriate organizations in order to bring visual awareness to their cause.

Read more:

http://www.shutterbug.com/content/cause-using-your-photography-purpose