Professor Virginia Franklin, Associate Professor at St. Francis College and JHP Advisory Committee Member, wanted to share this inspiring film by German filmmaker, Tobias Kriele, The Power of the Weak, about one man’s journey through the free health and medical system in Cuba, as well as his political work to free the Cuban Five.

The Women’s Press Collective hosted a showing of the documentary The Power of the Weak at ​St. Francis on Monday April 18th. The film is a great look inside Cuba through the profile of a young man named Jorgito who, despite having severe cerebral palsy, completed his education through college and has his disorder well controlled, both made possible by Cuba’s free education and health systems.

On Tuesday. April 19th, Jorgito received a visa to visit the States, and was in New York Saturday throughMonday. The WPC had a second showing of The Power of the Weak and both Jorgito and Tobias Kriele were present for a post viewing discussion. Lisa Daniell, the head of Women’s Press Collective, made a special effort to reach out to People living with disability.

At this time of changing U.S.-Cuba relations, The Power of the Weak screening and discussion provides a unique opportunity for U.S. audiences to learn about some of the achievements of Cuban society. Jorgito, who was born with severe cerebral palsy, and his family, friends, doctors and teachers, describe the physical and academic accomplishments, social integration and political participation of a young disabled person in Cuban society through compelling personal interviews. The documentary provides a picture of the world-renowned Cuban medical and educational systems that persist through the country’s economic suffering.

Jorgito’s deep love for his country found expression through his participation in the campaign to free the Cuban Five ― five Cubans whose imprisonment in the U.S. for infiltrating anti-Cuban organizations in Miami engaged in attacks on Cuba was internationally criticized, generating a world-wide movement for their freedom. Recognizing the relationship of his own development to the development of the society in which he lives,

Jorgito states: ”Without Cuba and its history, I wouldn’t be Jorgito.”

Please contact The Women’s Press Collective at 718-222-0405 for future screenings of the film.

 

 

 

Program Spotlight: Kips Bay Library

After being introduced to a wide range of compositional elements, the active seniors at the Kips Bay branch of the New York Public Library concluded their 8-week program with a final exhibition reflecting abstract images of city life.

The ordinary became extraordinary for two hours every Tuesday as students walked the streets of Manhattan putting to practice their new lessons. The program produced a final exhibit that hangs in the Kips Bay branch community room. Participants invited friends and family to the reception and we even had a visit from Jesus Perez, representative of Manhattan Borough President Gail Brewer’s office.

The participants were a spirited bunch and are already looking forward to another program they can join.

JHP and the Kips Bay program were also featured in Town and Village bringing great local attention to the good work happening in the community. After much support from NYPL and excitement over the coming exhibit,
additional prints were made and images have been framed for the public. You can view the exhibit at the Kips Bay branch 2nd floor community room.

Photos before they meet the white walls.

 

Heidi with her print.

Michael taking in fellow classmate artwork.


Carol shining bright with her print.

Town and Village article. Images by: Shelley W. (Kips Bay participant)

See You at Photoville!

As I look out my office window, I see the blue, yellow and red shipping containers of Photoville!

We will load in on Wednesday, September 9th and are very excited to introduce Josephine Herrick Project to a brand new audience. We will showcase photographs by participants in 2015 programs as well as highlight work from the high school students of the Step Up program at McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at NYU. Our volunteer teaching photographers have also submitted work to exhibit and we are introducing our organization’s founder, Josephine Herrick (1897- 1972), photographer and social activist.

Plenty to see, so we hope to see you at Photoville!

Photoville is held at Brooklyn Bridge Park and will be open to the public September 10-13 and September 17-20.

Opening Night Party: September 10

Brain Trauma Survivor’s Pursue Photography

by: Elana Hart, Development Director

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. More than 5 million people live with Chronic TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) which may include some vision and hearing loss, loss of memory, and other cognitive deficits. JHP has partnered with a Brain Trauma Survivor’s Group from Lower Manhattan. The photography program is taught by JHP photographers Alberto Vasari and Vik Gupta.

“The class consists of nine students (six female and three male) who have all suffered brain injuries that span pre-natal damage to trauma suffered just a few years ago.” Says Vik “This is a local chapter of a state-wide association and the participants have a wide variety of backgrounds ranging from business to combat. According to their activities coordinator, Mauricio, these workshops have, for the first time, sparked a lot of sharing among group members, increased their engagement with the environment through observation, and provided an outlet for their creative talents. The sharing is not limited to the images captured but extends to their worldview and experiences in life after their injuries. Working with this group is a joy and the benefits for both students and teachers are apparent.”

Vivian Maier Print for Auction on Paddle8 March 17-31

Proceeds support Josephine Herrick Project.

During Women’s History Month, we are thrilled that a Vivian Maier print was donated to us by John Maloof and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

The print is up for bid through March 31, 2015.

Vivian Maier (February 1, 1926-April 21.2009) was an American street photographer born in New York City. Although born in the U.S., it was in France that Maier spent most of her youth. Maier returned to the U.S. in 1951 where she took up work as a nanny for the rest of her life. In her leisure however, Maier had begun to venture into the art of photography. Consistently taking photos over the course of five decades, she would ultimately leave over 100,000 negatives, most of them shot in Chicago and New York City. She was recently the subject of the documentary Finding Vivian Maier.