Celebrate World Photography Day…Photography has the Power to Change the World

Today is World Photography Day.  Korske Ara, the founder of World Photography Day created this special day with a simple but compelling concept:  “I believe that photography has the power to tell stories, inspire generations and initiate change in the world.”  Here at the Josephine Herrick Project we have seen first hand how photography can change a child or an adult and inspire them to reach further and see the world with a different vision. Todd Adelman, Director of Special Projects for Block Institute, one of our program partners attests to the power of photography: “The cameras and instruction that [JHP] offers makes a remarkable difference to what an organization can offer to its participants’ quality of life. They are no longer defined by their disability but can live up to their full potential. Learning photography teaches them to open their eyes, appreciate, participate and be a partner in the world around them”.  bit.ly/AnJ7aC

So today on World Photography Day I encourage you to go out and take a meaningful picture about how photography has changed your world and share them on our Facebook page today: https://www.facebook.com/JosephineHerrickProject

You can also make a difference on World Photography Day by buying a JHP book http://jhproject.org/booksprints/ or donating to JHP to help us  the change the world of the participants in our programs through the power of photography.http://jhproject.org/donate-2/

About World Photography Day
World Photography Day originates from the invention of the Daguerreotype, a photographic processes developed by Joseph Nicèphore Nièpce and Louis Daguerre. On January 9, 1839, The French Academy of Sciences announced the daguerreotype process. A few months later, on August 19, 1839, the French government announced the invention as a gift “Free to the World”.

Another photographic processes, the Calotype, was also invented in 1839 by William Fox Talbot (it was announced in 1841). Together, the invention of both the Daguerreotype and Calotype mark 1839 as the year that photography was invented.

Over 170 years later, we have chosen this date, August 19th to celebrate photography, It’s past, present and future, technologically and artistically. Today, we can share memories across the globe in seconds. Photography is an invention that has revolutionised the way we see the world. We can visit places without leaving our home. We can share adventures with friends in another city and we can watch grandchildren grow up thousands of kilometers away. There was once a time when photography didn’t exist.

World Photography Day is about celebrating the ability we have to communicate though this powerful visual medium.

Read more:

http://www.worldphotoday.org/about

New Blurb Book: The Block Institute & Josephine Herrick Project

 Buy Me Today!  http://bit.ly/14lO0vk

 

The Block Institute is a Brooklyn-based school and service provider for developmentally disabled children and adults.  A JHP partnership was launched in 2008 to teach basic photography skills to 20 adults mentored by two staff members. The program has grown to three programs for adults, doubling the number of students to 42 in four classes. This past year, with a grant from an anonymous foundation, a year-long photography program  was added for developmentally challenged children in Kindergarten through third grade, which has greatly enhanced their lives and the work of their therapists.

The photography two classes occurred over nine months, from September 2012 through May 2013. The classes took place every other week and was taught by two professional photographers: Elliott Goldstein and Charles Turner. Students learned to critique images, flash lighting, low lighting, black & white photography, close-up photography, minimalism in photography and printing and framing of photographs. The two field trips to the art galleries were cancelled and instead the students photographed in the school, yard and the local neighborhood. The annual Art Expo at the Center was impressive this year as the youngest students in the community exhibited their photographs taken over the year.

Teacher 1: “I feel my students learned a great deal about the cameras, different options on the cameras such as zooming in and out and using the timer. Charlie, the photographer was very knowledgeable and worked well with the children. He made it fun for them. It gave them an outlet to help express themselves and it allowed the adults to view their world, through their eyes. It connected the school with the environment around them.”

Teacher 2: “Charlie instructed the students and helped them not just artistically but therapeutically as well. They learned about depth perception, practiced motor skills, helped with socialization, and boosted self-esteem.

A final project for the 2012-2013 year includes a Blurb book about the program which visually tells the story of the children, their cameras, and the therapeutic reward of self-expression. The Josephine Herrick Project also created a video that can be seen on YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=80wvRJbMSis of Director of Special Projects,Todd Alderman’s testimony about the quality of the JHP partnership and its unique opportunity for students with special needs to learn the joy of communicating through photography.

Buy Me Today!  http://bit.ly/14lO0vk

 

 

 

 

RTP makes a remarkable difference

 

 

 

 

 

 

BLOCK INSTITUTE TESTIMONIAL

“The cameras and instruction that RTP offers makes a remarkable difference to what an organization can offer to its participants’ quality of life. They are no longer defined by their disability but can live up to their full potential. Learning photography teaches them to open their eyes, appreciate, participate and be a partner in the world around them”. Todd Adelman, Director of Special Projects, bit.ly/AnJ7aC