New Haven Vet Center Exhibit

On February 21, 2017, photographs taken by New Haven based veterans were hung for the local community to view. An opening reception in the bright white gallery at Gateway Community College offered an ideal space to engage others in the art and vision of veterans, including some attending the college.

New Haven Vet Center, another strong partner in collaboration with JHP, offered an 8-week introduction to photography course to a large group of interested and invested future photographers. The vets participate with the vet center for counseling and other activities that support a healthy lifestyle as a former combat veteran. This program with JHP served as a creative outlet and safe space for veterans to reflect on individual voice and memory.

Instructed by JHP Teaching Artist–Susan Falzone, JHP board member–Randy Bourne, and New Haven Vet Center member–Bob Kukiel–the group took excursions around their immediate Orange,CT neighborhood, visited a nearby farm and practiced getting up close and personal with their subject matter.

Program Director, Afiya Williams, joined the group at the exhibit reception and was able to spend some time with New Haven Vet Center staff Gabor Kautzner and his radio show “Voice of the Veteran”. Stay tuned for access to the hour long conversation about veterans and the benefits of photography.

JHP continues to grow its partnership with agencies providing services to veterans within NYC and in surrounding communities. We are proud to work with such special individuals, hear their stories and enhance their storytelling through photography. If you’re in or around New Haven, take a quick ride over to Gateway Community College — the exhibit is up until March 5th.

 

The Gift that Keeps on Giving

Photo by: Linda C.

Navy Veteran Linda Catlett recently sent a thank you letter to JHP Executive Director, Maureen McNeil, for the amazing opportunity to learn photography at the Bronx Vet Center on Morris Avenue. JHP teaching artists, Robin Dahlberg and Adam Isler, were well received by Catlett and her fellow servicemen, no matter where they were on the photography expertise scale.

Catlett note reads, “As a novice with no experience behind a camera, I am happily surprised to realize a new joy in my life that will compliment my new career as a published author. Thank you so much for giving me this opportunity for betterment and enriching my life. The Josephine Herrick Project is a gift that keeps on giving.”

Photo by: Dondi M.

Photo by: Luther C.

Photo by: Marco B.

Happy Josephine Herrick Day!

New York, NY — In honor of it’s 75th anniversary, Josephine Herrick Project (JHP), a nonprofit combining photography and social justice, announced the establishment of March 30th as JOSEPHINE HERRICK DAY. This year the organization also established the Josephine Herrick Photography Award, an annual photography contest to support photographers committed to exploring stories of social injustice.

The 2016 winner is Donna Pinckley. Donna teaches photography at University of Central Arkansas and has received many awards, fellowships and honors over the years. From 1990 to 2008, Pinckley hosted fourteen solo exhibitions, and her photographs are currently in the collections of six art Museums. Here is what Pinckley says about her series “Sticks and Stones:”

“The series began with an image of one of my frequent subjects and her African-American boyfriend. Her mother told me of the cruel taunts hurled at her daughter for dating a boy of another race. As she was speaking I was reminded of another couple many years ago, who had been the object of similar racial slurs. What struck me was the resilience of both couples in the face of derision, their refusal to let others define them. Two years ago I began photographing interracial couples of all ages, aiming as always to capture how they see themselves, the world of love and trust they have created despite adversity. I began adding the negative comments they have been subjected to at the bottom of the images.”

The contest was judged by: JHP Board Vice President Miriam Leuchter, editor of Popular Photography and American Photo magazines; and renown photographers Nina Berman and Deborah Willis.

Josephine Herrick Project is committed to using photography to help level the field for the 31% of New Yorkers living in poverty and 11% living with disabilities. Twenty-six NYC communities annually participate in the photography programs, publications and exhibitions. Cameras are used as transformational tools that give a voice to all people and help them connect to the world through the visual language of photography.

With the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, founder Josephine Herrick left her portrait studio on 63rd Street and organized 35 photographers to set up photo booths at NYC canteens where young men going to war gathered. Like an early Facebook or Instagram, these photos were sent with a note to hometowns across the country in an effort to keep families connected. Herrick next organized volunteer photographers to teach programs to wounded soldiers in VA hospitals. This eventually spread to thirty states, and included, children, youth and adults.

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Happy International Women’s Day

Dear Friends,

As March 8th is International Women’s Day, I’d like to give a shout out to Josephine Herrick (1897 – 1972), a professional photographer who combined photography and volunteerism to help the neediest Americans. Inspired by the Red Cross and the USO, she set up a nonprofit during WWII and peace did not end her labor of love. For over 75 years, the organization has cultivated partnerships with military, medical and educational institutions, photographers and camera manufacturers, in a heroic community effort to make social change. In the attached photo from the 1950s, note the pride shown by the Syracuse volunteers (Josephine Herrick stands to our left). In honor of our founder, I am happy to announce the establishment of JOSEPHINE HERRICK DAY on March 30th. Each year, JHP will promote a photography and social justice project selected by people in the field. This year’s judges are Popular Photography and American Photo editor Miriam Leuchter, and photographers Nina Berman and Deborah Willis.

ANNOUNCING: Josephine Herrick Photography Award

JOSEPHINE HERRICK DAY IS MARCH 30th

In honor of JOSEPHINE HERRICK DAY and the 75th Anniversary of JHProject, we proudly announce the Josephine Herrick Photography Award. One photographer each year will be selected as winner by demonstrating with images and an artist statement their combination of photography and social justice.

About JHP:
Josephine Herrick Project is a 75-year old arts organization that offers photography programs to diverse communities throughout New York.

About Josephine Herrick:
Josephine Herrick (1897 – 1972) became passionate about photography as a youth when she discovered that darkroom work soothed an eye ailment. After college she studied at the Clarence H. White School of photography in New York City and through the 1920s and 30s Herrick ran a portrait studio on East 63rd street, photographing debutantes and children. With the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Herrick organized 35 photographers at the NYC canteens to take portraits of young men going to war. These portraits were sent to the men’s families with a hand-written note in an effort to keep families connected. Soon wounded soldiers were filling the VA Hospitals and Dr. Howard Rusk, father of rehabilitation medicine, invited Herrick to provide in house photography programs. This was the beginning of the nonprofit we now know as Josephine Herrick Project. Since then, the organization has enhanced the lives of over 100,000 Americans impacted by poverty and disability through the art of photography.

Contest Details:

Deadline: March 15, 2016

Qualifications: We are looking for compelling photographs that embody the ideas of public service and social justice as defined by the photographer.

Submission Guidelines: Photographers are asked to submit 1) a resume or bio 2) up to five photos and 3) a one paragraph artist statement that represent their passion for combining photography and social justice.

How to Submit: Photos and artist statement should be submitted through WeTransfer.com to afiya@jhproject.org. Maximum submission size is 2.0 GB.

Judging Process: Judges will review submissions anonymously and only the submitted photographs and artist statement will be considered in choosing a winner.

Judges: Miriam Leuchter is Editor of American Photography and Popular Photography Magazines and Vice President of the Board of Trustees at JHP; Nina Berman is a documentary photographer, author and educator, whose photographs and videos have been exhibited at more than 100 international venues and she is an associate professor at Columbia University and is a member of the Amsterdam based NOOR photo collective; Deborah Willis is a contemporary African-American artist, photographer, curator of photography, photographic historian, author, and educator. Among other awards and honors she has received, she was a 2000 MacArthur Fellow.

Winner: The winner will be announced on March 30th, Josephine Herrick Day. Winning photographs will be featured in Photoville 2016* and/or another New York City exhibition. Winning work will also feature on our social media and community newsletter.

*Pending our acceptance into the Photoville 2016 exhibit.

To learn more about us, check out @Jhproject on social media and jhproject.org.