Josephine Herrick Project
Formerly RTP (Rehabilitation Through Photography)

The Josephine Herrick Project is a nonprofit that enlists photographic community volunteers to educate students who have not had the opportunity to learn the communicative power of photography. Through partnerships with local organizations, JHProject’s completely free programs inspire children, teens, adults and seniors with the visual language of photography, enhancing their abilities to transform communities through artistic vision.

Young deaf man communicates through photography

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  • Adam Richard of Acushnet displays some of his photographs. Richard, 22, who is deaf, has found a special creative outlet in photography.

By Jackie Augustine – November 24, 2014
When I read this article over the weekend, I was delighted to hear of Adam’s creative outlet in photography.  At the Josephine Herrick Project we have been using the creative power of photography since 1941 to help individuals to learn the communicative power of photography. Through partnerships with local organizations, JHProject’s completely free programs inspire children, teens, adults and seniors with the visual language of photography, enhancing their abilities to transform communities through artistic vision. We have worked with a variety of organizations to share the amazing power of photography as a communications tool.  One of the programs we had recently was with the Lighthouse for the Blind helping to teach visually impaired individuals express themselves through photography.  I’m not sure if we have ever worked with the challenges of a deaf individual, but Adam Richards is proof that photography is an amazing outlet to express your creativity and to give a voice to a myriad of populations.  Kudos to Adam for what he has achieved. Please read his story below.

By Brian J. Lowney –  Contributing writer – SouthCoastToday.com –  Posted Nov. 21, 2014
ACUSHNET — A profoundly deaf young man has discovered the power of communication through a camera lens and looks to share his photography as he captures the history and beauty of the South Coast region.Adam Richard, a 22 year-old Acushnet resident and art student, spent many years living in an isolated world, like many individuals with disabilities. His only contacts were his parents Sharon Hollis and Steven Richard, several teachers and a small circle of deaf friends, he said. On the long daily commute to Providence, where he attended the Rhode Island School for the Deaf, he used his cell phone to take pictures of passing landmarks and sights that captured his interest. “I decided to try photography and then I felt I really liked it,” he signs to his mother Sharon Hollis, an employee of the Middleboro-based READS Collaborative, which provides services to students with special challenges. “I saw my mother’s photos and felt that her pictures expressed a lot feeling,” he continues, adding that he soon began photographing old buildings, fishing boats and nature. As his interest in photography grew, Richard said he tried to emulate various photographers whose work he saw in magazines.“I also took a lot of pictures of my pets,” he adds, noting that his favorite subjects included his family’s two Shetland sheepdogs, now deceased — a female named Max and her male counterpart Milo. Both dogs were deaf and intuitively formed a special bond with their young owner, a relationship that continues to bring a warm smile to his face. “Max was one of the first words he read when he started to read closed caption,” Hollis recalls.The enthusiastic photographer has particularly enjoyed photographing his three delightful cats, females Roy and Lola and a tomcat named Yo-Yo.“ I gave them names I could voice,” he says. “The cats are easy to photograph. They just lie around in the sun.” Now that he has a high-powered Nikon digital camera, Richard likes to jump in his car and drive along country roads scouring for interesting subjects to photograph.
Read more: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20141121/News/141129857

JHP Photo Plus Grand Prize Winner of the Canon Powershot GX1 Digital Camera Announced

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canon Powershot GX1 Digital Camera

By Jackie Augustine – November 19, 2014

Last month’s Photo Plus Show was a great success.  We had the opportunity to meet with many old friends and supporters to update them on the amazing year we’ve had at the Josephine Herrick Project.  We also go to meet hundreds of people who haven’t heard about our organization and the wonderful work we do creating FREE programs to help our students learn to communicate through the “power of photography.” Our grand prize winner hadn’t heard about JHP before but stopped by our booth at the Photo Plus Show.  He was impressed by what he saw and donated by buying a raffle ticket.

Our Grand Prize Winner of the Canon Powershot GX1 Digital Camera is Paul Cheung of North Bergen, NJ.  After receiving the news, Paul was very pleased and wrote us a wonderful letter that I would like to share:

My name is Paul Cheung, a retired marine biologist and fish pathologist at the New York Aquarium, the Wildife Conservation Society.  Upon retirment, I picked up photography and had been taking classes at the Senior Center of the University of Seattlement, Allen Street, in New York,

I enjoy beautiful images taken with a camera at different angles and lighting.  I came to appreciate artistic photos very much.

The donation I made (to JHP) was very small but I saw the good works that your Project had done, i.e., the young man’s photo album.  Your work helps the young people discover themselves through the eyes of the camera.  Congratlations for the job well done.”

Sincerely,  Paul Cheung

The Josephine Herrick Project is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit that enlists photographic community volunteers to educate students who have not had the opportunity to learn the communicative power of photography. Our volunteer photographers teach Veterans, children, teens, adults and seniors.  We create FREE programs to help our students learn to communicate through the “power of photography.”